The Secrets to Drawing – Two Point Perspective

The Secrets to Drawing: Two Point Perspective

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The Secrets to Drawing – Two Point Perspective — 38 Comments

    • Hi Shirley,

      You can use 2 point perspective whenever you like. If you start an image in 2 point perspective, most of the time, everything else in the image will follow.

  1. That’s really easy to understand! Thank You. But I have a question. As far as I understood you said that ‘never mix the methods’ Why did you say that? If we mix the methods, won’t it work? Or will it be so hard and complicated to draw?

  2. This is really helpful but It would also be nice to have an example of real scenery taken from a picture to see how we can use the one or two point perspective.

  3. I have been avoiding drawing old barns and landscapes because I’ve not understood perspective entirely. I understand the horizon, and theoretically I understand the vanishing points. However, in application, if I were drawing an old barn in a landscape, how do you determine where to put the vanishing points? This is what confuses me since where the vanishing points are places changes the picture. Thanks. Linda

  4. I enjoyed the video. I did learn some things… I get the 2 vanishing points BUT the building on the left, I did not understand that. What vanishing point did you use? How do you know what angle the top of the building should be? Was there suddenly 3 vanishing points?

  5. I thoroughly enjoy each and every lesson so far. I started out just signing up for the colored pencil course. Then I watched you answer a question on learning to draw before painting. I’m now a Member of all! What great fun and knowledge I’m gaining. I’m disabled and pretty much home bound so this is the highlight of each and every day. You are a great teacher. Thank you. Teresa

  6. I am loving the class and using some of the methods when I volunteer to teach drawing at the elementary school. I agree with Laura Andrews/ The last building was confusing. Where did you get the vanishing point for the top and bottom of that cube. I assume they are the same. But, it was rather vague.

    • Hi Katie,
      With two-point perspective, there are only two vanishing points for the entire image. All receding lines will go to either the vanishing point on the right or the vanishing point on the left. All of the buildings within the scene will use the same two vanishing points.

  7. Nice stuff.. easy to understand and very enjoyable πŸ™‚ watching, listening, doing and practice πŸ™‚ best way to learn i reckon πŸ™‚

  8. Thanks Matt
    Your lesson is easy to follow and I am already applying it in my urban sketching – you should see the improvement!! Thankyou so much😊

  9. Hi Matt, I’m new on this course. Without getting too complicated, what are some of the determining factors when choosing how many points of perspective I need in a painting?

  10. Hi Matt, Just one doubt. Why, when you realise that the building perspective would look unnatural, do you bring the upper line upwards and you do not make it straight? Will it be easy to realise when I have to avoid drawing the lines to the perspective line because of unnaturality? Thanks…

    • Hi Veronica,

      Thanks for your question. I don’t fully understand what you are asking. You do have to trust the rules of perspective. It may feel unnatural when you are drawing, but if you trust the process, the end result should look very natural to how we see buildings in space.

  11. Hi Matt! I’m a new artist at 57 yrs of age and I love it, but I know there are times I feel like I’m off somewhere in portraits, but mostly landscapes because I stink at perspective, lol. Really enjoying your courses and I know I will get much better with learning from them. Thank you so much for giving all of us the knowledge to be better artists! You’re a great teacher!

    • Hi Majorie,

      If you’re referring to actual scale, you can do this by taking the actual height of the building and reducing it in your drawing to a proportional line (the corner of the building). For example, let’s say the building is 60 feet tall. You could use a line for the corner of the building that is 6 inches tall – thus reducing each 10 foot segment down to one inch. This will get you started, but for the edges of the building that recede into space, you’ll need to work from observation to determine where to place the lines that mark the back edges. I hope this helps.

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