The Colored Pencil Course – Colored Pencil Basics

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ABOUT THIS COURSE

“The Colored Pencil Course” is designed to guide absolute beginners and intermediate artists to a level of producing professional quality colored pencil drawings through concise and “easy to digest” modules that include HD videos and Ebooks.

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Description: The basics of colored pencil drawing including the compositional make up of a colored pencil, the importance of pencil pressure, application techniques and mark-making, how surface texture affects the mark, mixing blacks, and the "5" do's for better hues.

Suggested Materials: Colored Pencils (Prismacolor Premier pencils are used but any brand is fine), Bristol paper, Mi-Teintes Paper

Next Video: The Magic of Burnishing

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Every demo above is included (and more not pictured.)

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Comments

The Colored Pencil Course – Colored Pencil Basics — 22 Comments

  1. I have a 72 set of Prismacolor pencils and recently had a chance to get a set of 76 Caran D’Arche Luminance at a really good price. I had seen where a gal who does portraits uses these pencils… upon checking after purchase, they also make others without the “luminance” designation. These say they have won awards for the highest lightfastness – 80%. What do you think of this brand of colored pencils and what significance – if any – does lightfastness have to do with performance? Thank You.

  2. I am a painter . Watching the technical work of placing all those layers on top of each other looks tedious on one hand but really fun and absorbing on the other. I just bought some Derwent intense pencils. Watching this video got me pretty excited to use them. I will use arches 140 lb hot press paper and I might add ink or water colours to intensify the process. I wonder if the pencils will give me a bit more control… Do you have a video on overcoming fear of ….diving in? wasting materials ? Or time? Arg the artist in me lol

      • Thanks Matt
        Matt I did a painting of mountains and trees and a shore line. I used gouache , white liquid golden acrylics, and Derwent inktense pencils and water . I have a rainstorm coming in with spots of light breaking through the clouds onto the water. Not just sparkles but areas . I want to show the light shaft coming down from above where there is a break in the clouds . Do you have any suggestions or demos on how to achieve this atmospheric effect? It’s kind of a complicated process.
        I look forwards to reading your comments on perfectionism . You seem to have a grasp of everything many artists need to tackle. Thanks 🙂

  3. I loved your article connected to the above link you sent me! . I teach art classes ( not as well as you do!) and I am going to read this article to my students if that’s okay with you.
    Also in pertaining to my own art . Its interesting to watch your clear concise instructions . It helps me when I am making a mess or have made a mess to step back and look at what I have done wrong. Then commit myself to correcting it instead of like you mentioned restarting it or putting it on a shelf.
    I don’t usually restart something but I do set things aside … For like a year! Haha
    Thanks Matt

  4. hi matt,
    1.may i use the “side “of the colored pencil when shading? (it seems to be smoother & i get an even transition)
    2.do you ever use watercolor paper with your colored pencils? (i know it has a rougher surface)
    3.have you had experience with strathmore pastel-textured finish/80 lb.(400 series)? i began a drawing with it and not
    sure if i should finish it cause it is too grainy and may not be worth all the hard work/time it is taking….
    please advise…
    thanks,raquel

  5. I’m a newcomer to drawing with colored pencil, having just completed the first two modules of the CP course using Prismacolor Premier pencils and Strathmore Bristol (“vellum” surface 100lb) paper. My current problem is that when I put down more than one layer of color, the result is hundreds of unfilled crevices. The first layer isn’t too bad in that respect, but subsequent layers look rougher than the first one, while the opposite should be true (that is, I think second, third, and later layers should produce a smoother look).

    I do know how to put down light, medium, and heavy layers of color. But even after multiple layers with the final layer being a heavy one, the valleys and crevices are still very obvious. The result still looks quite rough, and the color values aren’t exactly the same as the ones you’re getting using the same brand of pencils. Your own results without burnishing are much softer and more pleasing than I can accomplish. Yes – I know I can’t expect to duplicate the results you get, but my own results look so “rough” that I must be doing something incorrectly.

  6. hi. I recently by this course but I can not download the ebook. it opens the link but nothing show up on it. I hope you can help me with this issue

  7. Hi, This is the first lesson I have taken with The Virtual Instructor, and I am enjoying it because I appreciate the detail. I do have one comment, and that is that it would be helpful to show the reference photo or object somewhere on the page so we can see what you are doing and compare it to the reference. Thank you!

    • Hi Caryl, If a photo reference is used in the modules of this course, links are provided in the info box under the video. A photo reference was not used in this module. I hope this helps.

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