The Acrylic Painting Academy – Underpainting Part 1

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"The Acrylic Painting Academy" is designed to provide beginner and intermediate artists with a complete learning experience on painting with acrylics through "easy to digest" modules consisting of video demonstrations and accompanying ebooks.

Description: Part one of a series on indirect painting in which a monochromatic underpainting is developed, followed by applications of color glazes. The background of the underpainting is developed in this module.

Suggested Materials: Stretched canvas, acrylic paints (Titanium White, Raw Umber, Payne's Gray or Ivory Black), HB graphite pencil, various nylon brushes, water.

Photo Reference

Next Module: Underpainting Part 2

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Every demo above is included (and more not pictured.)

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Comments

The Acrylic Painting Academy – Underpainting Part 1 — 6 Comments

  1. Hello, would you be able to make the photo references from ALL modules, not just this one ( if there are any for the module) available to download? I can then view them in higher resolution and larger format. thanks

  2. Hello, great video! – a question regarding the light reference drawing you did prior to your underpainting. When you are applying your greyscale background over the reference lines it looks like you are completely covering over / eliminating those lines – (at least i couldn’t see any lines showing through on the video). Do you want to have a trace of those lines peeking through the paint so that you can use them as a reference point? It would seem like quite a lot of work to be covered over on the first paint application. Thanks!

    • Hi Skee,
      Since the light drawing is done to capture the overall contours, it’s ok to go over them with the underpainting. The underpainting then serves as the framework for the rest of the painting and the light lines are no longer needed.

Lesson Discussion